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Pastor Lawrence Onochie was Born on August 10, 1969, Onochie is from Ubulu ukwu, Delta State, located in the South-South part of Nigeria . ...

Pastor Lawrence Onochie was Born on August 10, 1969, Onochie is from Ubulu ukwu, Delta State, located in the South-South part of Nigeria. Onochie grew up in Lagos, where he attended Oshodi Comprehensive High School, Lagos State, Nigeria from 1981–1985 and Federal School of arts and science between 1986-1987. In 1988, he was admitted into the Anambra State University of Science and Technology, Anambra State where he graduated in 1993.


He became born again in 1987 through the ministry of Bishop Mike Okonkwo at The Redeemed Evangelical Mission church after a delinquent lifestyle. In 1988, he pastored a fellowship called ‘The Royal Priesthood Family’ and further went on to become a pastor of ‘Youths Aflame Christian Outreach’ (YACO), a revolutionary youth ministry which was an amalgamation of three different youth ministries between 1989-1991. Between 1991-1993 he also served as the Pastor of ‘El-shaddai Club’, a campus fellowship in Anambra State University of Science and Technology.

In 1994, Lawrence Onochie served in the birthing process of House On The Rock Church, where he served in different capacities over a period of seven (7) years. At House On The Rock Church, he held various pastoral positions, which included Pastor in charge of the Music Ministry, Coordinator PETRA Coalition, Director of Counseling and Director of Missions.

On 11 November 2001, the General Overseer of The Redeem Evangelical Church, Bishop Mike Okonkwo, commissioned The Kings Heritage Church, of which Lawrence Onochie has since been its Senior pastor. Apart from his desire for winning souls, Lawrence is passionate about the role of youths in the positive transformation of Nigeria, and Africa in general. His mandate has always been to 'bring people from the back side to the front side'.

He is the convener of Discovery For Youths, a youths Empowerment initiative held annually, which is "focused on raising a new breed of dynamic young leaders in Nigeria.


Students from Rockvale High School in Tennessee will pray before their football game this week after a complaint was filed against the co...

Students from Rockvale High School in Tennessee will pray before their football game this week after a complaint was filed against the coach.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation issued an objection against football coach Rick Rice after he prayed for his team, as reported by Faithwire. According to the organization, only students are allowed to lead prayers. The coach apologized for any misunderstanding after discussing the matter with the school principal and acknowledged that he led two prayers after games so far that season. 


But students from the high school believe the complaint was not needed.

“We always prayed before games. It was just part of what we did,” said Drew Kilgour, a Rockvale resident.

“That’s something that you see on the fields. That’s something that you see in the locker rooms. That’s something you see in the classrooms, in small groups when it comes to any athletic sport, but especially in football, we really see that,” Ronnisha Simmons-Duke, a mother of a Rockvale high school student, said.

In response to the complaint, Rockvale students Madison Nowacki and La’Naya Nelson announced an official prayer circle at 6:30 p.m. before their weekly football game, according to the Daily Journal.

“We have been talking about wanting to pray with our team for a while, but we were scared at first,” Nowacki said. “After the complaint, we thought we should voice our opinions as well and stand with our coach.”

Nowacki continued: “I believe that the complaint was very unnecessary and it upsets me to see it. Coach Rice is an amazing, outgoing and hardworking coach. …It was a prayer to heal the boys, and make sure they stayed strong.”

With brothers on the football team, Nowacki and Nelson hope the prayers help the boys “play harder, smarter and stronger.”

The FFRF (The Freedom From Religion Foundation)  is an atheist-led nonprofit organization that works to enforce the division between church and state and most recently called out a school in Robertson County, Tennesee, for baptizing athletes. According to CBN News, the school system responded that the activities were student-initiated and led.

Desmond Tutu was born of mixed Xhosa and Motswana heritage to a poor family in Klerksdorp, British Imperial South Africa . Entering adulth...

Desmond Tutu was born of mixed Xhosa and Motswana heritage to a poor family in Klerksdorp, British Imperial South Africa. Entering adulthood, he trained as a teacher and married Nomalizo Leah Tutu, with whom he had several children. In 1960, he was ordained as an Anglican priest and in 1962 moved to the United Kingdom to study theology at King's College London. In 1966 he returned to southern Africa, teaching at the Federal Theological Seminary and then the University of Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland. In 1972, he became the Theological Education Fund's director for Africa, a position based in London but necessitating regular tours of the African continent. 


Back in southern Africa in 1975, he served first as dean of St Mary's Cathedral in Johannesburg and then as Bishop of Lesotho, taking an active role in opposition to South Africa's apartheid system of racial segregation and white-minority rule. From 1978 to 1985 he was general-secretary of the South African Council of Churches, emerging as one of South Africa's most prominent anti-apartheid activists. Although warning the National Party government that anger at apartheid would lead to racial violence, as an activist he stressed non-violent protest and foreign economic pressure to bring about universal suffrage.

In 1985 he became Bishop of Johannesburg and in 1986 the Archbishop of Cape Town, the most senior position in southern Africa's Anglican hierarchy. In this position he emphasised a consensus-building model of leadership and oversaw the introduction of women priests. Also in 1986, he became president of the All Africa Conference of Churches, resulting in further tours of the continent. After President F. W. de Klerk released the anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela from prison in 1990 and the pair led negotiations to end apartheid and introduce multi-racial democracy, Tutu assisted as a mediator between rival black factions. 

After the 1994 general election resulted in a coalition government headed by Mandela, the latter selected Tutu to chair the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to investigate past human rights abuses committed by both pro and anti-apartheid groups. Since apartheid's fall, Tutu has campaigned for gay rights and spoken out on a wide range of subjects, among them the Israel-Palestine conflict, his opposition to the Iraq War, and his criticism of South African Presidents Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma. In 2010, he retired from public life.


Tutu polarised opinion as he rose to notability in the 1970s. White conservatives who supported apartheid despised him, while many white liberals regarded him as too radical; many black radicals accused him of being too moderate and focused on cultivating white goodwill, while Marxist-Leninists criticised his anti-communist stance. He was widely popular among South Africa's black majority, and was internationally praised for his anti-apartheid activism, receiving a range of awards, including the Nobel Peace Prize. He has also compiled several books of his speeches and sermons.

Tutu is one of the patrons of The Forgiveness Project, a UK-based charity which seeks to facilitate conflict resolution and break the cycle of vengeance and retaliation.



Tutu is a committed Christian and starts every day with a period of quiet, reflection, walk  and Bible reading. Even on the momentous day of 27 April 1994 when blacks were able to vote for the first time, Tutu wrote “As always, I had got up early for a quiet time before my morning walk and then morning prayers and the Eucharist.”

Tutu is also a supporter of interfaith harmony. He admires fellow religious leaders, such as the Dalai Lama and feels that a person’s outer religion is not of critical importance.


“Bringing people together is what I call ‘Ubuntu,’ which means ‘I am because we are.’ Far too often people think of themselves as just individuals, separated from one another, whereas you are connected and what you do affects the whole world. When you do well, it spreads out; it is for the whole of humanity.”

McCauley was born in Johannesburg on 1 October 1949. He took a keen interest in bodybuilding, is a Mr South Africa and took part in the M...

McCauley was born in Johannesburg on 1 October 1949. He took a keen interest in bodybuilding, is a Mr South Africa and took part in the Mr Universe bodybuilding championships in London in 1974 where he finished in third place. He was also a nightclub bouncer for a time.


McCauley attended bible college with his first wife Lyndie at Rhema Bible Training Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma during 1978/9. On their return to South Africa the McCauleys started Rhema Bible Church under Rhema Ministries SA in the home of his parents, Jimmy and Doreen, which 13 people attended. Membership grew and the church moved into the former Constantia Cinema in Rosebank, Johannesburg. Under the leadership of Ray and Lyndie McCauley, the church outgrew its premises and moved to a warehouse in Jan Smuts Avenue in Randburg before moving to its current premises. 

In 1985 the church moved into the newly constructed 5,000 seater auditorium in Randburg, Johannesburg. The new church was dedicated on 16 June 1985 by Dr Kenneth E Hagin, the late founder of Rhema Ministries in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The auditorium was later upgraded to more than 7,500 seats to accommodate the growth of the church. Today the church has a 45,000 strong congregation, which is the single largest church congregation in southern Africa.

Towards the end of the apartheid era, McCauley and his associates were involved in numerous critical events that helped with the peaceful transition to a democratic nation in 1994. During this time he interacted with leading churchmen like Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu and Reverend Frank Chikane.


McCauley is a well-known speaker at church events around the world.

McCauley has authored several books including Our God Is An Awesome God (1993), Walk In Faith (1998), Making Your World Different (2000), The Secret Place (2003), Expect More (2005), Bottom Line (2005), Choose This Day (2007), Live Long, Die Young (2008), Power & Passion, Holy Ghost Fire and Purpose Powered People. His biography, Destined To Win (1986), was written by Ron Steele.

Rhema Television (RTV) broadcasts A New Day with Pastor Ray featuring teachings by McCauley.

Moses Bliss  popularly known as Moss Bliss is a Nigerian Gospel Artiste, pianist, Drummer, Vocal Coach, Music Director of The Engraced Musi...

Moses Bliss  popularly known as Moss Bliss is a Nigerian Gospel Artiste, pianist, Drummer, Vocal Coach, Music Director of The Engraced Music Crew (TEM crew) and  CEO TEM planet. Music is what has been keeping him going and the annointing of the Holyghost makes his Gift valueable, Moses  love to inspire Greatness in people, he was born make people see all they could be and to help people unveil their Potentials and unleash their talents.


He said "one of my purpose is to amplify God's Word through my music... Don't forget you were born into dis world with a definite purpose.


He has Shared the stage with alot of Gospel Greats like Sinach, Tye Tribbett, Samsong, Sonnie Badu, Buchi, Tim Godfrey, Joe Praise etc, He has performed in and out of Nigeria,


Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman held a rare meeting with American evangelical Christians, as the ultra-conservative Mu...

Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman held a rare meeting with American evangelical Christians, as the ultra-conservative Muslim kingdom seeks to open up more to the world and repair an image of religious intolerance.


The delegation was led by communications strategist Joel Rosenberg and included former U.S. congresswoman Michele Bachmann, according to an emailed statement by the group, as well as heads of American evangelical organizations, some with ties to Israel.

"It was a historic moment for the Saudi Crown Prince to openly welcome Evangelical Christian leaders to the Palace. We were encouraged by the candor of the two-hour conversation with him today," the statement said.

The delegation also met Saudi officials including Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir, Saudi Ambassador to Washington Prince Khalid bin Salman and secretary-general of the Muslim World League Mohammed al-Issa.

A visit by such prominent non-Muslim leaders, who estimate they represent about 60 million people, is a rare act of religious openness for Saudi Arabia, which hosts the holiest sites in Islam and bans the practice of other religions.

Some of the figures' support for Israel, which the kingdom does not recognize, is also striking.

For instance, Mike Evans, founder of the Jerusalem Prayer Team, describes himself on his website as "a devout American-Christian Zionist leader."

Saudi Arabia has maintained for years that normalizing relations with Israel hinges on its withdrawal from Arab lands captured in the 1967 Middle East war — territory Palestinians seek for a future state.

But increased tension between Tehran and Riyadh has fueled speculation that shared interests may push Saudi Arabia and Israel to work together against what they regard as a common Iranian threat.

Prince Mohammed, who in recent years has loosened strict social rules and arrested Saudi clerics deemed extremists, said in April that Israelis are entitled to live peacefully on their own land.

A month earlier, Saudi Arabia opened its air space for the first time to a commercial flight to Israel.

Several members of the delegation, which met with Abu Dhabi's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed in the United Arab Emirates earlier in the week, have also advised U.S. President Donald Trump on faith issues.